ISSN: 0970-938X (Print) | 0976-1683 (Electronic)

Biomedical Research

An International Journal of Medical Sciences

Abstract

Incidence of clinical isolates and its antimicrobial resistance pattern among the nasal and hand swabs of operation theatre staff in tertiary and secondary care hospitals

The aim of this study is to identify antimicrobial resistance patterns among bacterial isolates causing nosocomial infection among staff of the surgical units of two hospitals in the north Indian setting. This was a cross sectional study design. Samples were obtained from health care givers with the selection criteria of: No previous history of hospitalization, no history of likely contact with patients of Staphylococcus aureus, and the health personnel available in the operation theatre at the time of sample collection. All the specimens were inoculated on sheep blood agar and MacConkey agar media and thereafter incubated at 37°C for 24 h for the bacterial identification. The MRSA was lower among nasal (8.1%) and hand swabs (6.7%) than MSSA (nasal=33.9%, hand=28.3) among surgeons. However, MSSA was 30% among nasal swabs and 24.1% among hand swabs in tertiary care hospital. Gram positive bacterial isolates were highly resistant to ampicillin (98.3%), amoxy/clav (95.4%), active ingredient (82.3%) and tetracycline (77.1%) in nasal swab of surgeons and OT health staffs in tertiary care hospital while these were ampicillin (84.3%), amoxy/clav (79.9%), active ingredient (68.7%) and tetracycline (65.7%) resistant in secondary care hospital. Gram negative bacterial isolates were highly resistant to ampicillin (88.0%), amoxy/clav, ceftazidime and cefepime (80.0%) each in nasal swab of surgeons and OT health staffs in tertiary care hospital while these were ampicillin (83.0%), amoxy/clav (68.8%), active ingredient (61.1%), ceftazidime and tobramycin (60.0%) each resistant in secondary care hospital. The data of the present study demonstrate the widespread problem of antibiotic resistance among staff of surgical units in the two hospitals. Continued surveillance is necessary to guide appropriate empirical therapy for these infections. It is imperative that all professionals take an active role in infection control within their establishments. More resources should be provided to encourage good antibiotic practice and good hygiene in hospitals.


Author(s): Mohammed Saleem, Irfan Ahmad, Fahaad Alenazi

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